Hello and welcome to Packard Motor Car Information! If you're new here, please register for a free account.  
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Recent Comments
Who is Online
85 user(s) are online (61 user(s) are browsing Forums)

Members: 3
Guests: 82

George, Wes Hogeland, 54ocmac, more...
Helping out...
PackardInfo is a free resource for Packard Owners that is completely supported by user donations. If you can help out, that would be great!

Donate via PayPal



« 1 ... 8 9 10 (11)

Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Home away from home

Packard Newbie
See User information
Hey Leeedy,

Thanks for the picture(s)!! I can sure see what you mean about that horn button not being the best design and not lasting. Looks like it could very easily get damaged with just regular wear and tear use and I'm not surprised that they are 'scarce as hen's teeth'. Must say, you have quite the collection/archives of vintage bikes... Hat's off, and thanks for sharing. Chris

Posted on: 4/5 17:38
'If you think you can, or you think you can't - you're right!' Henry Ford.
1939 Packard Six, Model 1700
 Top  Print 
 


Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Home away from home

Leeedy
See User information
Quote:

Packard Newbie wrote:
Hey Leeedy,

Thanks for the picture(s)!! I can sure see what you mean about that horn button not being the best design and not lasting. Looks like it could very easily get damaged with just regular wear and tear use and I'm not surprised that they are 'scarce as hen's teeth'. Must say, you have quite the collection/archives of vintage bikes... Hat's off, and thanks for sharing. Chris


Hi Chris, you are most welcome anytime. Happy to help out and happy to respond with accurate info. And this stuff is a lot tougher to find than automotive!

I try to provide original info from the sources.

By the way, all the bicycle had to do was to fall over or the button snag on clothing or anything and it was GAME OVER. Buh-byyye brittle bakelite button!

As for the original special Schwinn-Built handlebars with the built-in bakelite "A.S." button, I shudder to think of what an original set would cost today ...IF anyone could find one. AND yes, the Schwinn-Built Packard bicycle I showed earlier in an ad from 1937 had this exact handlebar and built-in button.

Today, after all these years, most people collecting and restoring Schwinn-Built bicycles from this series and 1937-38 don't even know about the special handlebars and built-in button. This is despite all of the TV shows, "books." internet DIY experts and DIY web sites. "Schwinn" is talked about, rampantly boosterized, fanatically intellectualized, promoted, adored, written about and argued about to death. BUT... bet you won't find AND SEE this source info out there! Especially without shoulda-woulda-coulda guesswork and supposition.

A huge amount of American bicycle history isn't real history. It's gossip, guessing, repetition of myths and whoever has the loudest voices, the most followers. and seals of approvals. Accompanied by uninterpreted reprints or mis-identified reprints. This is what happens when no one knows any better. Make up a good-sounding myth, get enough people to agree on it... and the myth becomes "fact." Like Packard dealers giving away Packard bicycles to sell a car to a balking buyer. Regardless of the truth that this was never the cause or reason for the existence of Packard bicycles.

REgarding the archive collection, yes, over 80,000 original vintage bicycle catalogues, photos, books and more ranging from 1860s to the 1990s, specializing in the Classic Era of American-made bicycles, 1920 to 1965 (as I first defined it in Bicycle Dealer Showcase magazine in 1978). And over 600 films (real films, not videos).

One of the biggest blunders of the book publishers was to refuse to publish the original Classic Bicycles history book I wrote in the 1970s. One very large company told me (and I still have the letter) that there was no serious market for a book on this subject. AND that they also said they would NEVER publish a book on bicycles (ten years later they knocked off my book and used poser people doing cheap imitations of me).

Today, they're still making money off of my ideas and early efforts–all without saying so or even being honest enough to acknowledge my expertise. After all these years, the book publishers and the hobby STILL don't have it right or complete. This is despite dozens of imitators and knock-off attempts.

My manuscript from the 1970s and book remain unpublished to this day. Yet they contain photos and information that [i]no one around today has ever seen or read[/i]. The almighty publishers that were wrong at the end of the 1970s are still wrong today. But they'll never admit it. And book publishers are STILL not placing credit where credit is due as my work continues unrecognized today. But look at the interest in this subject generated just here alone... on a Packard automobile site! And how much bicycle AND automotive history has been revealed just here in this thread?

Anyway, you are most welcome.

Posted on: 4/5 21:43
 Top  Print 
 


Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Home away from home

Leeedy
See User information
Okay, the Schwinn worshippers have had some attention. Let's move on to 1936 and Colson-built Packard bicycles.

Here is an original ad from our collection showing a Colson-buit Packard bicycle sold by an Ohio chain store and shops. Just imagine... they delivered the bicycle to you on a payment plan of just $1 down! Delivered! Still a decent amount of money in 1936 when it could easily buy you five or six gallons of gas. But if you were lucky enough to have a job in those tough times, not bad at all!

While most of the original advertisements for Colson-built Packards show lesser models, here is a very deluxe model. And it differs substantially from Colson-branded bicycles in several details. This one even came factory-equipped with a speedometer!

And this seller was not a wholesale-distributor... this was a retailer... dealing direct with retail customers. So there was no Packard Motor Car Company dealer involved here.

Packard bicycles have generated more silly stories than even Schwinn-Built bicycles–which is a lot! Again there are silly myths about these bicycles on some DIY sites and guess-at-it forums. One outrageous claim has been made that Packard Motor Car Company somehow owned Colson Corporation– the actual manufacturer of Colson bicycles and Colson-built bicycles. Ridiculous. Another absurd myth bandied around is that Colson Corporation was owned by Schwinn. Rubbish. Yet another claims Colson-built Packard headbadges were somehow Schwinn headbadges. Absurd.

One important point. This store ad makes a mythical claim of its own. It states that Packard bicycles are "exclusive" at this store chain–implying no one else sold Packard bicycles. Not true. Packard bicycles were sold by several retailers and bicycle shops coast to coast. Fact. But this just serves to further complicate what is already a complicated subject for most today.

People just plain don't understand how the American bicycle industry and sales operations (whether they were retail or wholesale) worked in this country way back when these bicycles were made. So? The car people have invented their stories. And the bicycle people have invented their stories. Almost none are accurate, but that doesn't seem to stop people from repeating the wild tales! Or making up more stories.

And if someone who really knows how all this worked says so? Try telling that to the folks spinning the yarns and you'll be shouted down. So the situation is what it is. And dopey stories continue on... and on...and on.

Colson Corporation was a large entity in its own right. They made everything from children's sidewalk wheel goods to a full line of very high quality bicycles to hospital equipment and wheelchairs. The company was also famous for its industrial handling equipment, heavy-duty carts and its world-renowned industrial casters. We have almost all of the bicycle catalogues from beginning to end along with many of the industrial catalogues and and numerous factory photos. We interviewed some of its designers back in the 1950s, 1970s and 1980s. And yes, we have several Colson bicycles as well as Colson-Built Packard bicycles.

Colson Corporation was located in Elyria, Ohio. This making it a natural to find the particular Ohio company (in the ad) selling Colson-built Packard bicycles. Well over half of Colson's bicycle production was not under the Colson brand. And Colson-Built bicycles were not necessarily the same as "Colson" brand bicycles.

However... if you read closely, you won't find any references to "Colson" in the ad. This despite people on the internet today stating "Colson Packard" –as if this was a legitimate model of Colson brand. Not so.

And again... no mention in this nice advertisement of these Packard bicycles being given away with Packard automobiles. This, no matter how many people out there are still perpetuating this myth. Oh– but the store did give you a red/white/blue bicycle racing cap if you showed up with your parents to look at these Packard bicycles! Have you got yours?

Attach file:



jpg  PackardBicyce1936 copy.jpg (410.63 KB)
1249_60859503f20ac.jpg 1014X1264 px

Posted on: 4/25 10:04
 Top  Print 
 




« 1 ... 8 9 10 (11)




Search
Recent Photos
Photo of the Day
1955 PACKARD 400 2DR HDTP
Recent Registry
Website Comments or Questions?? Click Here Copyright 2006-2021, PackardInfo.com All Rights Reserved