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Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
Joined:
2011/8/12 5:37
From Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 108
I assume my carb got gummed up from old gas. The gas is about 2 years old. The car will start up on starter fluid. I have never rebuilt a carb before of any kind. I have done a lot of other things on the car though. Am I jumping in the deep end thinking I can rebuild a WCFB carb myself for a 53 Patrician?
Any suggestions? And preferred vendor for parts like Mike's Carburetors or Daytona Parts etc.

Thank
John

Posted on: 12/31 9:28:54
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John Rhodes

1953 Packard Patrician
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Quite a regular
Joined:
2015/12/18 7:04
From san antonio texas
Posts: 37
Daytona carburetors sells great kits, have one in my 1950. If you never done a carb before make sure you have a pictorial and clean your parts good. It mite be beneficial to have a friend that built a couple to help out. Have fun, if I was closer Id help you. Dave

Posted on: 12/31 10:31:27
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happiness is a 1950 Packard 1950 club sedan deluxe [img]http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/registry/index.php?Action=view&ID=1892[/img]
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
Joined:
2011/8/12 5:37
From Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 108
Dave I will try to find someone. Also I have another carb in a box that probably doesn't work. I will practise taking it apart and putting back together first. Or if I give up I will have the real one rebuilt.

Thanks.

Posted on: 12/31 16:58:00
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John Rhodes

1953 Packard Patrician
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/2/16 15:39
From Santa Fe
Posts: 5370
A Motors Repair manual would be a good thing to have. The manual has sections for fuel (including a carburetor section), ignition, starter and generator in addition to specific sections for make of automobile. They are often available on eBay and/or Amazon for a reasonable price. A Packard shop manual is also a necessity when owning one of these automobiles. You may be able to download one from this site for free or get one from the Packard club. Good luck and Happy New Year.

Posted on: 1/1 10:28:54
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
Joined:
2011/8/12 5:37
From Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 108
Thanks you too. I have a Packard shop manual.

Posted on: 1/1 17:20:47
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John Rhodes

1953 Packard Patrician
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Not too shy to talk
Joined:
2018/4/29 15:57
From Southern Maine
Posts: 21
If you approach the whole job methodically and take your time there is no reason you can't do the rebuild yourself.
There is a manual for the WCFB on line, you should have that printed out for reference in addition to your Motors manual.
You'll need a kit from the vendor of your choice.
A clean well lighted work area is a must.
I would recommend a gallon of carb cleaner from NAPA (read the directions and cautions, they aren't kidding), its nasty stuff but it works great.
You probably should have a source of compressed air to clear the various air/fuel passages.
Its not voodoo or even rocket science.
A few years ago I did the cleaning and overhaul on my 55 Studebaker WCFB which is different only in detail, it was pretty gratifying when it went well.
Good luck.

Posted on: 1/3 16:05:37
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
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Joined:
2006/4/17 11:22
From North Aurora, IL
Posts: 9223
I rebuilt mine just by following the directions with the kit, and it was the first time I had ever touched a Carb. A cookie sheet works great to keep small parts from rolling away.

Posted on: 1/4 7:16:51
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1954 Packard Clipper Deluxe Touring Sedan | Project Blog

"While it's nice to be important, it's important to be nice."

"Although no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new end."
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
Joined:
2011/8/12 5:37
From Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 108
Thanks I am feeling better.

Posted on: 1/4 7:43:56
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John Rhodes

1953 Packard Patrician
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
Home away from home
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2014/7/15 11:30
From Terrebonne, OR
Posts: 1741
Yes, it’s easy to do and I’ve always rebuilt my own on all my vintage cars. The hardest part is getting everything clean so a carburetor cleaning bucket and basket is a must, along with plenty of cleaner such as Chem-Dip (if it’s still available) or an equivalent. As was said, follow the chemical warnings as it is strong stuff!

Posted on: 1/4 10:09:09
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Re: Gummed up carb never rebuilt a carb
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 186
Johntrhodes81
I also vote with Jim/KB1MCV, ‘jump right in to the deep end’. I started working on WCFBs, two at a time, some 50 years ago when I had a set on a ’55 Chevy, and then fast forward to the single set-up on my ’54 Cavalier. I would like to provide some suggestions based on my experiences.

Let’s start by assuming there was nothing really ‘wrong’ with the carburetor when the car slipped into hibernation, and the task is to renew parts that do not hibernate well like rubber and leather parts. Plus there’s the goal of cleaning the unit both inside and out.

I suggest/recommend:

1. Resist the urge to remove the throttle plates. Unless the throttle shaft has been abused or requires bushings there is more risk than reward in removing throttle plates.

2. As BigKev suggested disassemble the carburetor in a clean pan. I use a transmission oil pan, but only because I have one. A turkey pan from the grocery store will work just fine, or as suggested a cookie sheet, but later on when you’re in the cleaning stage a pan with some depth will be an advantage.

3. Place the parts as you remove them into individual containers. I use tuna fish cans for the small screws and clips, and larger ones for the other ‘stuff’. Watch those little hair clips they have been known to take flight during installation. Use a hemostat or needle nose pliers to hold-on to those clips.

4. Make sure you keep the primary and secondary parts in separate containers. The jets are different, so don’t mingle them.

5. Do NOT invert the carburetor until the all of the springs and check balls are accounted for. There should be two check devices in the accelerator pump system. A ball and the bottom of the well, and a needle under the discharge nozzle. There a springs at the ‘vacuumeter’ and accelerator pump. The first time the carburetor body is inverted it should be done over a clean pan.

6. Lacquer thinner is a fairly good solvent for carburetor cleaning, and it’s available at relatively low cost. I use a ‘tinners brush’ to wash the parts with solvent, and change the solvent when it gets real dirty.

7. Fuel ‘shut-off’ valves are currently available in two design configurations. The ‘Daytona’ kits will likely come with the ‘flat disk’ design valve. With this design the float level adjustment is via ‘extra’ sealing washers between the valve and carburetor housing (described in the instructions). The other valve design ( historically correct for a WCFB ) features a conic ‘needle’, as in needle and seat, and the float level adjustment is via bending the tang that closes the needle. The ‘flat disk’ design is not robust to side forces and therefore the tang on the floats should ‘push’ dead center on the valve. That’s why the seats are shimmed with sealing washers. Again all of this is covered in the instructions if your kit has ‘flat disk’ valves.

8. I use a piece of cardboard holding a jet or air bleed in-place. I then hold the whole mess up to the sun or bright light bulb (cardboard shielding my eyes) and look up the bore of the jet/air bleed. You will be amazed on what you can see with only the small ‘pin prick’ of light shining through the orifice. If you can’t see light, or the light is fussy, then the ‘thing’ must be cleaned.

9. Knowing from the specification sheets what the ‘correct’ diameter of the orifice is, I will use a number drill SMALLER than the specification diameter to clean-out the ‘gunk’. Don’t use a drill that is larger than the specified diameter. For about $10 you can buy a set of drills, numbers 61 to 80, on the internet. That size range will suit your needs.

10. Compressed air can be used to verify that large drilled passages are clear. You may not need to remove any of the aluminum plugs that seal the cross drilled passages. If the passages are sealed with threaded plugs feel free to remove them.

11. The carburetor kits that were available back in the ’50 –’60s came with float level gauges . . . not so much today. I use a drill of the correct diameter to verify the float level adjustment.

12. Re-installing the metering rods can be a bit finicky in that the spring tends to push the rods out of alignment with the jet bores Take your time they do fit.

Other than ‘take a lot of photos’, that all I’ve got.

DP

Posted on: 1/4 10:58:52
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