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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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todd landis
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Make sure the rubber gasket in your fuel filter housing has not swollen up.

Posted on: 1/1 16:01
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Joe Santana
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Posted on: 1/1 16:12
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Joe Santana
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PERCOLATING/BOILING FUEL: I think this article in HOT ROD has the answer.
https://www.hotrod.com/articles/mixing-new-fuel-for-old-cars/

Highly volatile winter fuel blend and lack of heat insulation for the carburetor.

Here are some excerpts:

"There are two serious concerns with ethanol blends: too-high RVP (Reid Vapor Pressure) causing vapor lock behavior and percolation of the fuel. "

Here is exactly what I described:
"The problems begin with a vintage fuel system that employs a dead-head pump and float bowls where the fuel can heat up and percolate. This problem is particularly acute after running the engine for a sustained period of time at highway speeds, then suddenly coming into stop-and-go traffic. The associated heat sink effect will elevate the temperature of the carburetor and the fuel will boil in the bowl. This can lead to serious flooding on some cars and hard starting problems when hot in other vehicles, while many other cars may notice rough idle characteristics."

"To prevent the fuel from boiling in the carburetor or fuel lines you should insulate the carburetor base to prevent unwanted heat sink."

Fortunately I found in my misc fuel box some spacers and gaskets to do the job. In 2018 I modified a 1/2" wrench to get the mounting nuts. With the spacer I will probably need new carb mounting studs, but I'd have to get them out. I may. need to lose the throttle guard.

Won't. be sure if this solves the problem, but I'm going to give it a try.

Wish me luck.

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Posted on: 1/2 9:50
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Joe Santana
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I haven't removed the carb yet, just in the process, but I noticed in that article the a gasket should go on either side of the spacer. I have those, but
QUESTION: Do I need to use some kind of sealant?

Thanks in advance.

Posted on: 1/2 10:39
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Owen_Dyneto
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No sealant.

Posted on: 1/2 11:04
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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JWL
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Joe, the choke heat pipe connection looks suspicious. It appears as if a rubber hose connects the choke housing with the pipe. There should be a direct connection of the pipe to the housing.

I had good results adding diesel fuel to the gasoline when I refueled. A gallon with a full tank worked wonders. This was when I had the 47 Custom Clipper with the same engine as your 40.

The Hot Rod magazine article offers good advice about insulating the carb. Also, insulating the fuel pump is a good thing to do too. Vapor locking primarily takes place in the non-pressurized part of the fuel system.

How did adjusting the idle mixture go? Good advice has been offered on this by others. If you can screw the jet screws in all the way and the engine continues to idle, then you have a flooding carb issue.

I still have the BMW.

Happy New Year.

Posted on: 1/2 11:26
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And make happen
What occupies our mind... (W. Scherer)
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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kevinpackard
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Joe - the picture of the base of your carb installed doesn't look like it has any spacer between the carb and the manifold. Looks like just a gasket to me. Not sure how it normally is on your year, but on my car the spacer is a 1/2" piece of plastic with gaskets on either side. Without that spacer I'd think the carb would get pretty hot. I don't know that it would have anything to do with the fuel flooding issue though...

-Kevin

Posted on: 1/2 11:52
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Joe Santana
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Thanks, Everyone.

Dave - I won't use anything but a gasket-spacer-gasket.

JW - That tube with the rubber is. the Throttle Guard vacuum tube. I was told at the Oregon shop that is was leaking air so they disconnected it and added. the rubber. The auto choke heat tube is on the bad side.

I took pix of all the disassembly in hopes I can put it all back together correctly. I'll post those later.

Kevin - You're absolutely right. There was just a gasket and no spacer. Most likely the cause of the volatile winter bland gas getting hot and percolating. Of course it never did this in 2 years since the carb went on until I bought a tank of winter blend in November.

I removed the carb and removed the studs using the double nut method. On my way to auto store for 2" studs instead of the 1-1/2" ones I pulled.

Fingers cross. Thanks again.

Posted on: 1/2 12:17
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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JWL
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Joe, mistook the throttle guard for the choke housing. Still, the rubber hose "fix" looks Mickey Mouse to me. The threads on the flare nut look to be in good. Problem may be in the fitting that screws into the guard housing. If so, these inverted flare fittings are easy to replace. A vacuum leak will cause all kinds of engine running problems because of the leaned out mixture. Good luck.

Posted on: 1/2 13:30
We move toward
And make happen
What occupies our mind... (W. Scherer)
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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Joe Santana
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I dove into the manual and the first item to check on percolating and flooding is the Heat Control Valve.
HEAT CONTROL VALVE: The valve shaft has to be free to move. There are instructions for lubricating it, but not with oil. The thermostatic spring on the front side couldn't hold the valve closed because the counter weight on the back side was positioned too high, blocking the valve from rotating all the way clockwise to the closed position, which directs warm exhaust up to the riser hot box on which the carburetor is mounted. I loosened it from the shaft, rotated the shaft clockwise until the valve closed and reset the counter-weight at about 10 o'clock.

HEAT CONTROL VALVE ADJUSTMENT
I can find no instructions for setting the heat control valve, but I would do this (PLEASE correct me if this is incorrect!), if, when grasping the counterweight on the rear side of the manifold box, the shaft rotates easily to both the closed (clockwise) and open positions:
1. When the engine is cold, the heat control valve should be closed; that is, the shaft it is mounted on is turned, from the rear perspective, all the way clockwise.
2. To set the valve in the closed position,
a. on the rear side of the manifold box, loosen the set screw holding the counterweight, it’s not necessary to disconnect the anti-rattler spring.
b. on the front side of the manifold box, loosen the retaining nuts which hold the bimetallic thermostatic spring-retainer cover just enough to turn the cover counter-clockwise, tightening the spring tension, until the valve is held closed with minimum tension. Then tighten the retaining nuts.
c. Now, with the valve held all the way closed by the thermostatic spring, the counterweight on rear side of the manifold box should be positioned as high as it will go. Hold it in that position by tightening the set screw. Reconnect the anti-rattler spring if it was disconnected.
3. The bi-metallic spring on the front side of the exhaust manifold box holds the valve closed while the manifold warms up. When closed, the valve diverts hot exhaust flow up and around the manifold riser hot box, on which the carburetor is mounted, to warm gas and facilitate a smoother engine start and warm-up.
4. As the engine exhaust warms the manifold, it heats the thermostatic spring causing it to expand/relax and turn the valve shaft (from the rear perspective, counter-clockwise) to open the valve midway, allowing more exhaust to exit directly and bypass the hot box.
5. The counterweight aids in this opening of the valve and therefore moves counter-clockwise from its starting position at the top to a lower position.
6. When the engine is at normal operating the temperature, the spring opens the valve all the way, preventing exhaust from entering the upper riser hot box where the carburetor is mounted and sending it all out the tailpipe.

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Posted on: 1/24 8:44
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