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Re: 1941 Packard Radio/Antenna Question
#11
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JWL
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I believe these radios have a trimmer capacitor to tune the radio to the antenna. The adjustment is made by tuning the radio to a weak station usually in the higher frequency range and then turning a screw adjustment on the outside of the radio until the best reception is received. A tuned antenna makes a big difference in reception and quality.

Radio Shack used to sell radio noise suppression kits which consisted of a resistor that was installed in the coil to distributor high tension lead and some capacitors to fit to the generator and other places.

Posted on: 9/29 11:18
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Re: 1941 Packard Radio/Antenna Question
#12
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Ragtime Kid
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Hi all,

I ended up tossing the cheap antenna from my failed under-the-fender experiment but will look into picking up another one and running the experiment you suggest, HH.

One thing though -- I keep reading that AM antennas must be oriented vertically to have any hope of functioning well, so it seems and under-the-fender installation will be a futile exercise, even if properly grounded/shielded?

Posted on: 9/30 17:27
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Re: 1941 Packard Radio/Antenna Question
#13
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HH56
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I had not read there was a particular orientation for a fender antenna but I am not really a radio guy and suppose it is possible. Running board antennas were an option for many years and those are horizontal but perhaps there is something in the way that two masts are generally used in that type antenna has something to do with orientation --- or it could just be that body metal shields a considerable amount and the second mast is just for added gain.

There are repro running board antennas available but at a fairly hefty cost. https://classiccarreproductions.com/pr ... er-running-board-antenna/ I wonder if it would be feasible to try and make something along the lines of the Packard version using tubing and insulating bracket pieces made of materials from McMaster or a similar vendor. The masts must be kept from touching metal but by using plastic insulating material between metal brackets clamped to the running board and masts that is not too hard. The two isolated masts are connected together at the rear while the antenna lead in cable center conductor attaches to one mast in the front with the lead in shield grounded. If you still have your old antenna to use the special lead in wire that might be another easy thing to try.

Here is a bit from an old Yesterday's Radio catalog showing the mast and insulating detail. Lavine bought the business and it would be nice to get a copy of the Packard bulletin mentioned in the old description but since it is not listed as a digital reprint not sure Lavine would sell it separately.

Attach file:



jpg  antenna.jpg (446.67 KB)
209_61563f1a2bbad.jpg 1236X1818 px

Posted on: 9/30 17:51
Howard
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Re: 1941 Packard Radio/Antenna Question
#14
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Fish'n Jim
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Kinda late but I recall this post.
Just so happens, I was having issues with boat stereo reception on my replacement boat. It has a "marine" AM/FM antenna which amounts to a short piece, ~2', of coax with a male end radio connector that branches into two ~2' long insulated wires that you spread out. They had it jammed together down in the side wall and wasn't correct. I reoriented and works beautifully now.
This would fit nicely up under the dash and only costs a few bucks.
search "marine antenna" dipole or under dash type.

Posted on: 11/15 11:30
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Re: 1941 Packard Radio/Antenna Question
#15
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Guscha
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Every -> now and -> then the talk revolved around this topic.

Resized Image
image contributed from Howard (HH56)

Posted on: 11/15 14:25
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