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1936 120 running board rubber removal
#1
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

KMcoldcars
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I decided my next project would be replacing the rubber on the running boards and painting the underside of them.

Is there any easy was to remove very old, hard rubber from the running boards? Right now I am using a hammer and chisel.

Also, the new running board rubber, which came with the car when I bought it in 2001, has the raised longitudinal ribs in the rubber, and the back of the rubber is flat. My running boards have the raised longitudinal ridges in them. They are not flat. Do I need new rubber, or can I fill in between the ridges on the running boards, making them flat, and install the rubber?

Or, can I cut out the ridges and weld in new metal, making the running boards flat and install the rubber I have?

Posted on: 6/11 19:23
1936 Packard 120 convertible sedan
1916 Ford Model T Coupelet
1962 Thunderbird
2000 Corvette convertible
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#2
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

flackmaster
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The instructions from Steele suggest filling in between the ridges with Bondo or some other leveling substance. I never liked the Steele product for this reason, but that's all that is on the market. Metro made them with the grooves, but getting them fitted was almost as much work.

And as for removal of the rubber, I feel for you...some have softened up old rubber with a propane torch, but this may lead towards temptation to light the whole project on fire. NOT a fun task. I much prefer crustified desert rubber that practically falls off...
And what is "worse" is you can buy new sheetmetal (smooth top) boards but the bottoms won't look right. Well, maybe they will soon....

Posted on: 6/11 21:45
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#3
Home away from home
Home away from home

tsherry
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You might try an infrared paint remover. While I used this on my (ancient) house, it is far safer than a torch or conventional heat gun.

I used this one; bought it 25 years ago and paid about half of this:

https://eco-strip.com/product/speedheater-ir-system-standard-kit/

Posted on: 6/11 23:22
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#4
Home away from home
Home away from home

Greenfield
See User information
Perhaps try some Purple Power and see if it dissolves or soften the rubber or glue. What I would do is leave a rag soaked in PP on the rubber for a day or so and see if it produces a reaction, either turning the rubber to a gelatinous muck that can be easily scraped off or loosening the glue so the rubber can be pulled off less a hammer and chisel. If it works, fashion a way to soak the boards directly in it. Underlying metal won't be affected. Purple Power works so good as a stripper/degreaser that it'll probably be illegal next year. Be sure to use gloves, cause PP isn't kind on skin.

Posted on: 6/12 6:01
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#5
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

David Patla
See User information
I used an air chisel with a narrow chisel that fit between the grooves. This worked very well, had the rubber off in no time.

Attach file:



jpg  20220612_074051.jpg (2,400.52 KB)
85430_62a5d2a20341d.jpg 3264X2448 px

Posted on: 6/12 6:49
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#6
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

Bob J
See User information
I know you already have the material, but I did mine with rubber stair runner. $12 after tax for enough for both sides. Used rubber contact cement. Did it in the sun so the rubber was very pliable and laid it down and trimmed it afterward. Cut the holes with an X-Acto knife and trimmed and wrapped the edges. Now the ribs are showing through the rubber. I am very happy with it, but I grant you it is not the original pattern, but no one I know has every seen the originals so they will never know. I suppose a Packard show judge will tut-tut it but I own the car!

Attach file:



jpg  Running Board Mat-mounted.JPG (2,565.17 KB)
225215_62a5f6b393929.jpg 3072X2304 px

Posted on: 6/12 9:20
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#7
Just popping in
Just popping in

Aiden
See User information
When I did mine I was told to use my outdoor grill to heat it up. Worker well. The neighbors will wonder what you are cooking

Posted on: 6/12 22:06
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Re: 1936 120 running board rubber removal
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

bullsh--ter
See User information
Heat gun worked good for me.When I cleaned the metal part they were to far gone and am now making new running boards out of flat steel and manually rounding the edge.

Posted on: 6/13 15:11
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