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Re: Type of gas and whether to use lead substitute?
#11
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Jack Vines
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Don,

Octane was definitely a thing in the 1950s.

Quote:
In 1956 Sun Oil opened its first custom-blending pump in Orlando, Florida; from five grades of gasoline, customers could select the one that best met their car's octane needs and the pump would mix it then and there.
The blend could be chosen from 100% regular to 100% premium; no new news there, but it could also dispense 75-25, 50-50 and 25-75 regular/premium.

jack vines

Posted on: 2022/11/19 11:11
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Re: Type of gas and whether to use lead substitute?
#12
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humanpotatohybrid
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Fun fact that's how all gas pumps work to this day: there's no "mid range" tank.

And I wouldn't be surprised if the pumps dispensing E15 88 are blending E10 87 with a fraction of E85.

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Posted on: 2022/11/19 13:11
'55 400. Needs aesthetic parts put back on, and electrical system sorted.
'55 Clipper Deluxe. Engine is stuck-ish.
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Re: Type of gas and whether to use lead substitute?
#13
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Packard Don
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Quote:
Octane was definitely a thing in the 1950s.


I didn’t mean to imply that it wasn’t used then but rather that it was not stressed as much as it is today.

Posted on: 2022/11/19 14:27
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Re: Type of gas and whether to use lead substitute?
#14
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

Redhexagon
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A cast iron thumper of an engine such as ours is a lot more prone to detonation than modern engines, given the same compression ratio. There is no comparison.

Most engines like the Packard V8 are fine on 87 AKI gas if their compression ratio is under 9.0:1 and the ignition timing is set correctly. You might need to put 89 AKI in them if you are at low altitude or hot conditions.

I consider 89 AKI the minimum for engines of 9.0:1 to 9.5:1. 91 AKI makes me more comfortable.

Above 9.5:1 I'm grabbing 91 AKI. I like 93 AKI if I'm going through the desert in summer with them.

-----

I have never once in ten years of daily driving old carbureted cars had any sort of problem what so ever from using plain old pump gasoline with up to 10% ethanol.

I've had to jet some of my 1970's and newer engines richer since ethanol burns leaner and those cars were jetted on the edge of lean originally anyway, but cars prior to the 1970's are usually jetted rich enough from the factory to not have that problem.

Unleaded gas will accelerate valve seat wear if your engine is running on plain iron seats and you run it under heavy loads or high speeds. The effect at lower speeds and loads is greatly reduced. Lead substitute additives are just upper cylinder lubricants, and there are many brands of those. Even the old Marvel Mystery Oil and Seafoam are upper cylinder lubricants. Lucas and AMSOIL also make specialty upper cylinder lubricants. Adding them to your gasoline will help the valve seats, among other things. Modern gasoline doesn't have much lubricity to it, and Packards do not have PCV to recycle some engine oil through the intake for you, so adding some more lubrication property to the fuel is not a bad idea.

Posted on: 12/7 1:28
1955 Patrician. Topaz / White Jade.
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