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« 1 2 (3) 4 5 6 ... 18 »

Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#21
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JWL
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Quote:

West Peterson wrote:
... or lamb that is just a few hours old. That's what mouton is. The unique element of the unborn lamb (or just-born lamb) wool is that it has a very tight curl to it (giving that very swirly look that you see in the back carpeting), which straightens out very fast after they're born.
My son just received a "mouton" Russian hat that is advertised to be mouton, but it does not have any curl to it at all. So, in my opinion, it is not really mouton.

Am I incorrect?


West, thanks for the clarification. I was confusing Mouton with Mosstred, a Wilton wool carpeting with a foam rubber backing. I saw Mouton carpeting, like you have, in a 39 Twelve. Quiet luxurious.

(o {I} o)

Posted on: 2010/2/5 10:37
We move toward
And make happen
What occupies our mind... (W. Scherer)
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#22
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West Peterson
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While I had the car up on the hoist to change all fluids, including oil, transmission, overdrive and rear end, we noticed that the tie rod ends and king pins were in need of replacing. As illustrated earlier, first we had to clean the years and years of thick gunk and grease.
The tie rods, of course, are quite easy to replace.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:15
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#23
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Ozstatman
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Now there's something you don't see often in this day and age, contemporary black and white pic's! Bit of a time warp West, they complement your '40 perfectly.

Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:19
Mal
/o[]o\
====

Bowral, Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia
"Out of chaos comes order" - Nietzsche.

1938 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

1941 One-Twenty Club Coupe - SOLD

1948 Super Eight Limo, chassis RHD - SOLD

1950 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

What's this?
Put your Packard in the Packard Vehicle Registry!
Here's how!
Any questions - PM or email me at ozstatman@gmail.com
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#24
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Owen_Dyneto
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Nice pictures West. From my own experience with two 1941s and with 5 or 6 others that friends own, those cars weren't easy on king pins, seems a very frequent need, though fortunately not a very difficult job and parts available though not always up to the quality of the OEM parts. That's just something we have to live with and be glad that we can get parts. If you need a bushing driver and reamer, I may have one, let me know. The one I have is for 0.868 diameter pins.

EDIT: I believe the driver/reamer I have is for the Clipper chassis and newer thru 1956, probably not suitable for Safe-T-Flex suspension. Sorry.

Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:35
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#25
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West Peterson
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Thanks for the offer, Dave, but the job is already done. Follow along. This is meant as a "how to," for those who may want to know more about king-pin replacement. I'm going to start way at the beginning, though, because I want to show those that have never done this before what you need to do "on the way," such as wheel bearing packing.
I'm going to assume that everyone knows how to remove their wheel.

1. Remove the grease cap. There may be a special tool to do this, but I just wedge a small screw driver in and twist. Wrapping a channel locks around it and twisting back and forth will work as well, but you need to be areful not to crush it.
2. Remove the cotter pin and nut.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:47
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#26
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West Peterson
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3. Behind the nut is a washer with an inner tab and alignment holes...
4. and another nut with a button that locks into one of the washer's holes and helps secure everything in place.
5. Once the nuts and washers are removed, the bearing will easily pull out.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:51
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#27
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West Peterson
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Normally, now would be the time to disconnect the hydraulic brake lines before further disassembly. However, this car had a recent brake job performed and there was no need to upset a job we felt was done well.

6. The four bolts holding the backing plate on need to come off first. There are castle nuts and cotter pins on the reverse side, which also hold the spindle arm to the backing plate.

7. Since the flexible hydraulic brake lines were still connected, the brake assembly needed to be secured so the brakes lines weren't supporting its weight. We used a coat hanger and hung the brakes from a fender brace.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 13:57
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#28
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West Peterson
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8. With the axle spindle and king pin assembly revealed, we can begin to extract the worn king pins.

9-10. First, the upper end cap needs to be removed. We drilled a hole in it and used a cotter pin puller to hook it and twist it out.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 14:05
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#29
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West Peterson
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11. The lock pin is driven out using a punch slightly smaller than the pin. NOTE: The lock pin bores are tapered, and are removed through the back on the right side of the car (passenger side) and through the front on the left side. I learned this only after trying to send the pin out the wrong direction, then realized that the assembly is the same on both sides, just swapped.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 14:10
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Re: Peterson's 1940 Packard
#30
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West Peterson
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12. Now you can remove the king pin by tapping it out of the axle bore from the top. The lower end cap will come out at the same time.

13. Once the king pin has been extracted, the spindle can be removed from the king pin assembly.

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Posted on: 2010/3/5 14:15
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