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Re: Mike
#21
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Ozstatman
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Quote:
Leeedy wrote:....Sorry I missed this posting. At the risk of being chastised for taking the thread askew as has happened on this site in the past, I will respond here because the question was asked...... I do still carry window-pane money around in my wallet. I presume you easily know what this is.....
Leon,
for the response even though we're going off at a tangent to the Websites major theme "Packards". Plus, I certainly know what "window-pane" money is.

Posted on: 10/6 22:32
Mal
/o[]o\
====

Bowral, Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia
"Out of chaos comes order" - Nietzsche.

1938 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

1941 One-Twenty Club Coupe - SOLD

1948 Super Eight Limo, chassis RHD - SOLD

1950 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

What's this?
Put your Packard in the Packard Vehicle Registry!
Here's how!
Any questions - PM or email me at ozstatman@gmail.com
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#22
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Tobs
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@ Kevin, I remember your saga with the windshield in your car. That is *very* useful info about using a cut down sedan windshield instead of the convertible/coupe windshields that are "unobtanium".

@Leon, as a Miata owner and fan, I don't mind at all the extra text and comments that are not directly packard. -I got a copy of your book last month when I was in the US, and am reading it now.

Wish I was at Hershey now!

Posted on: 10/7 15:46
1953 Clipper Delux Club Sedan, 1969 912, 1990 Miata, 2009 Ford S-Max.
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#23
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kevinpackard
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Mike - if you do end up going to "cut windshield" route, you should just be able to use your existing as an exact pattern to cut the new (once it's removed). Measure from the bottom. If your current windshield somehow breaks when removing, I could send a precise template of my old windshield that I still have.

-Kevin

Posted on: 10/7 16:11
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#24
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Leeedy
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Quote:

Tobs wrote:
@ Kevin, I remember your saga with the windshield in your car. That is *very* useful info about using a cut down sedan windshield instead of the convertible/coupe windshields that are "unobtanium".

@Leon, as a Miata owner and fan, I don't mind at all the extra text and comments that are not directly packard. -I got a copy of your book last month when I was in the US, and am reading it now.

Wish I was at Hershey now!


Hello...

RE: cutting a windshield on a 1950s car... Biggest issues here are cutting laminated safety glass. People today try to cut this stuff as if it is modern tempered one-piece glass. It isn't. Lamination construction needs to be understood. AND any cutting needs to be done with the glass warm and ambient temps likewise. Once cut, extreme care needs to be taken to ALSO make sure the center layer has been fully cut, not just the glass. Finally edges of the cut windshield need to be dressed (ground, rounded). Doing so will make the cut windshield less likely to crack.

RE: the "book"... I presume you mean the Creative Industries book. IF you got a first edition, be sure to contact me for an errata sheet since the editing on the first edition was not to my liking and allowed things that should have never been.

Have fun and good luck with your Packard.

Posted on: 10/7 22:32
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#25
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MJG
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If you've never cut laminated safety glass before, take it to someone who has. I use to manage a production line making commercial safety glass - it takes patience and skill. Old lami becomes brittle too. It will not be tempered, no windshield glass is tempered. If you attempt to cut tempered glass it will explode. Side lites are tempered so if impacted they crack into pieces that have no sharp edges of note to cut you. Modern windshields are heat-strengthened laminated (a mezzanine between annealed and tempered). If a windshield were tempered and struck on a roadway it would explode and come inward. If it were tempered and laminated it would become unclear and you could not see. Heat-strengthened is the best of both worlds. In 1953, it's probably closer to annealed and that would make it easier to cut.

Mike

Posted on: 10/8 9:30
1948 Custom Eight Victoria Convertible
Others:
1941 Cadillac Series 62 Deluxe Convertible Coupe
1956 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#26
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Leeedy
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Quote:

MJG wrote:
If you've never cut laminated safety glass before, take it to someone who has. I use to manage a production line making commercial safety glass - it takes patience and skill. Old lami becomes brittle too. It will not be tempered, no windshield glass is tempered. If you attempt to cut tempered glass it will explode. Side lites are tempered so if impacted they crack into pieces that have no sharp edges of note to cut you. Modern windshields are heat-strengthened laminated (a mezzanine between annealed and tempered). If a windshield were tempered and struck on a roadway it would explode and come inward. If it were tempered and laminated it would become unclear and you could not see. Heat-strengthened is the best of both worlds. In 1953, it's probably closer to annealed and that would make it easier to cut.

Mike


You are absolutely correct. Modern tempered automotive safety glass normally "pelletizes" into lots of little pieces– especially on sharp impact. This is a fact very well known to car thieves and street gangs who use engineer's punches (or even spark plugs on a string) to get into a vehicle very quickly. I did professional investigations on this subject and wrote reports decades ago.

But I understand it is also probably best not to use the term, "tempered" in what I was talking about. But this would take a lot of detail which is not gonna happen here. Suffice to say that I have been there when glass was cut for a fiberglass car (specifically for the backlite) and this glass was referred to as "tempered." I also was very involved in developing tempered glass windows for actual cars at the OEM level. It was my recommendation and development that led to a tempered glass window to replace the former clear vinyl backlight on the Mazda Miata convertible top.

Regardless... the advice to get a professional to do any glass cutting for an automobile– especially for the laminated safety glass on your Packard is very good advice. I always prefer to recommend and use professionals rather than DIY.

Posted on: 10/8 14:24
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#27
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Tobs
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Looking at the specification list, the original tire on the Caribbean was 8.00x15. (clippers had the 7.60x15 and Patrician had 8.20x15)
Coker has 8.00x15 available in the American classic with a listed height of 29.41 inches. Diamondback doesn't list an Auburn radial in exactly 8.00, but only 8.20 with a height of 29.2 inches.
Keep in mind the inspectors here in Germany are usually picky about having the correct tire size.
If I go with the diamondback, which is an "incorrect size" of 8.2, and not 8.0, then I need some info to justify my selection. (29.2" or 29.4" is only .2 inch, or ~5 mm difference)
Does anybody know a diameter specification for a normal 8.00x15 so I could better argue the case that 8.20 is an acceptable tire for the caribbean? They are sticklers for correct radius -so that the speedo is accurate and, and width so nothing rubs.
I think the 8.20 will be acceptable, but may need to explain the exact sizing when it comes inspection/import time. I know we have been through this a few times with people on the forum here, but thought I would ask. Thanks!

Posted on: 10/11 14:57
1953 Clipper Delux Club Sedan, 1969 912, 1990 Miata, 2009 Ford S-Max.
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Re: Mike
#28
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HH56
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Diamondback put out a comparison chart some years back on crosses to the various size schemes over the years. Don't know if it is still on their site but will post it and maybe you can find some additional info. Diameters over the years did not seem to stay constant so an original tire replaced even when the car was fairly new could be different by some fraction.

Attach file:



jpg  tire size.jpg (611.51 KB)
209_61649bc633d76.jpg 2358X992 px

Posted on: 10/11 15:18
Howard
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Re: Mike's 53 Caribbean
#29
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Tobs
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Caribbean is still in the US, at a "Packard MD in MD" if you will. -before shipping over here. I went with the Diamondback 820 tires, and am having a few problems taken care of by a pro.

I must show my ignorance here, is the hood scoop functional or just for show on a caribben?

Posted on: 11/17 16:37
1953 Clipper Delux Club Sedan, 1969 912, 1990 Miata, 2009 Ford S-Max.
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